Monday, February 09, 2009

The Future of Magazines

Newsweek may make it by doing this, but I wouldn't given them even odds. Newsweek faces stiff competition for that market, but it has realized the weekly news summary magazine died with free news on the Internet.
In Canada, McClones was re-worked into a somewhat interesting conservative magazine that appeals to people like me who enjoyed the original National Post for its quirkiness and eclectic writers. Still, my gut says the new Maclean's is out of step with these recessionary times and the new Obama world. I'd say there's about a 3 to 1chance Maclean's will be gone in five years or sooner. Maclean's has moved far too far from the Canadian magazine-buying mainstream and puts far too much online.

4 comments:

Anonymous said...

If you're right, that will bring to four publications, along with Alberta Report, Saturday Night, and The National Post (as it was once known), that Ken Whyte has (effectively) killed. Talk about the kiss of death, and an expensive one at that.

Ottawa Watch said...

Yup. I factored in that track record.

Anonymous said...

Time has pulled the plug on its Time Canada edition. I wonder how the Economist, the best of the bunch, is doing. Pretty well, I would think, and it doesn't put much of its content on the web for free.

http://canadianmags.blogspot.com/2008/12/time-canada-folding.html

Ottawa Watch said...

The Economist has it right. Those publications that stay off the web, don't "dumb down" and keep working hard to get good copy survive.